Egerton castle 

Egerton castle : Egerton Castle in Njoro is a magnificent architectural masterpiece that was created by British aristocrat Lord Maurice Egerton to impress his fiancée, Lady Victoria, who was Austrian. Hugh Coltar, his farm manager, had erected a six-bedroom home for him, but Lady Victoria had already rejected it, comparing it to a dog kennel and a chicken coop that should be explored on a Kenya safari.

Built in 1954, Lord Egerton’s spectacular 53-room castle was four stories tall and unmatched in any country, let alone England. He was resolved not to give up too soon because he was so madly in love. He installed the newest electrical and mechanical devices, such as an escalator, in the castle.

Egerton Castle was designed to make an impression, from the dressed stone cut according to the correct template to the flagstaff at the top that waved the Union Jack. For the panels, they imported oak from England.

Egerton Castle was designed to make an impression, from the dressed stone cut according to the correct template to the flagstaff at the top that waved the Union Jack. For the panels, they imported oak from England.

The majority of the stone was imported from Italy, with some also coming from Njiru and Kedowa. Shipped from Italy and England were the marble and tiles used for interior decoration.

Albert Baron, an engineer, travelled all the way from Rome to supervise the building of the castle. The technical workforce crew consisted of about one hundred Indian labourers. Locals supplied manual labour as well.

In the castle’s heyday, Lord Egerton would sit in the ballroom beneath a golden curtain and enjoy symphonies played by orchestras and seasoned musicians from around the globe on the carpets patterned with gold. Its most noticeable feature was a grand piano, which was now in poor condition.

The ballroom of the castle with the grand piano.

There were many bathrooms at Egerton Castle, and they were all equipped with electric warmers for drying hair and warming towels. The kitchen was the epicenter of perfection, complete with a makeshift abattoir.

The cook would prepare food for Lord Egerton after taking a shower and applying perfume. Despite this, the aristocrat continued to employ a Nakuru-based physician to check his food twice a day.

The noblemen are said to have slept on a Vono bed and mattress. These items were repurchased from a Kenyan who had purchased them at an auction by Egerton University, the castle’s management organization.

Egerton castle 
Egerton castle 

In contrast to conventional castles, Egerton Castle lacks a garrison or moat for defence. After blowing the trumpet three times, Ndolo, Lord Egerton’s dependable attendant, raised the Union Jack every day.

When anyone entered the castle’s boundaries, they would all stand to attention, even Lord Egerton. The Kenyan flag strangely flies there these days.

16 years later, at the age of 80, Lord Egerton finished the fairytale monument of love. Regretfully, Victoria did not think much of the castle and, this time, declared it to be a museum, which is exactly what it became.

The stairway to the Castle.

Some claim that Lord Egerton erected the castle as a memorial to his loneliness rather than for the love of his life. For whatever reason, in his later years, his contempt for women, hens, and dogs was obvious. He outlawed them and posted posters warning of gunfire if any females were seen trespassing on the property.

Lord Egerton died in 1958 without producing any children. His family’s bloodline ended four years after the castle was finished.

After 64 years, the castle in Njoro is still standing, its lush gardens and immaculate lawns lending a romantic and mediaeval feel to the stunning surroundings.

A view of the gardens from the castle’s summit, where the union jack-adorned flagstaff was located.

Paradoxically, the area that was once off-limits to women is today a well-liked location for elegant nuptials. It’s probably safe to claim that others still possess the castle of love. Always make time to stop by this location when you are in Njoro. If you’re interested in learning more about Lord Maurice Egerton, the Egerton University website has a fascinating biography of him.

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